Thursday, 14 May 2015

The Best Incense Makers



*****

This started off as a collection of incense makers, but at least three of the companies on my list do not make the incense themselves, but either commission it, or rebadge it as their own, and sell it under their brand name. As such, this is a list of both makers and distributors. I will separate the makers and the distributors shortly.

The Daily Record's Top 10 Best Selling  Incense Sticks in India January 2019.


Top Ten

Producers 



Number One
Satya
Indian producer

Satya Sai Baba is the brand name used by the Indian incense company Shrinivas Sugandhalaya of Bangalor, which was founded in 1964 by Shri Satyam Setty from small premises in Mumbai.  It has expanded to now employ approximately 2,500 workers in manufacturing facilities in Bangalore and Mumbai. Their incense sticks and cones are high quality; hand-rolled from a masala of crushed fragrant ingredients around a charcoal base. The company use  halmaddi, a traditional fragrant resin, though the use has changed or declined over the years. They make the world's most famous and acclaimed incense, Satya Nag Champa.

Top scents: Satya Sai Baba Nag Champa Agarbatti (50);  Satya Natural (42);  Satya Harmony (36);  Satya Supreme (35);  Stamford Midnight Calm (by Satya) (34);  Satya Super Hit (33);  Satya Aastha (30)

Scents reviewed: 7
Highest score: 50
Lowest score: 30
Average score: 37

Conclusion: There is a reason that Satya are both popular and acclaimed:  they make quality incense in a traditional manner that people enjoy. They are not exciting - the scents sort of  group together in a homogeneous whole with little difference between them; the packaging is amongst the most boring and unattractive on the planet, but they are reliable, producing consistently good products. Two of  Satya's scents are in my top ten, and the Nag Champa is my No 1 incense - a real life changer. All of their scents, so far, I would be happy to buy again. Somehow, though, despite the quality, I don't rush to buy a new Satya scent because I somehow know how it will smell, so there is a lack of interest and curiosity. And if I am going to buy Satya, I might as well get the Nag Champa - job done. I will, however, slowly make my way through the range, seeing if they can surprise.


*****

Number Two
Goloka
Indian producer

Goloka was founded in 1997 in Bangalore, and is a non-profit trust which provides food and education for disadvantaged children, and training and assistance for women who have lost their husbands. Goloka are one of the leading Nag Champa brands - second after Satya (Shrinivas Sugandhalaya of Bangalore).


Scents reviewed: 8
Highest score: 48
Lowest score: 29
Average: 37

Conclusion: One of my favourite incense makers.


*****

Number Three
Aromatika
Indian producer

An Indian company based in Jaipur who have been making incense for over 30 years.

Top scents: Aromatika Ace Scents Dragon Blood (45); Aromatika Ace Scents Frankincense & Myrrh(40); Aromatika Ace Scents Opium (32);  Aromatika Ace Scents Patchouli (32).

Scents reviewed: 5
Highest score: 45
Lowest score:
Average score: 35

Conclusion: I have only recently tried their products. Packaging is basic plastic bags, and the sticks are machine made and perfume dipped. Some of their products are not exciting - the base sandalwood paste dominating a little to much; but the perfumes are attractive enough, and at their best they are really quite delightful. I shall explore further.

*****


Number Four
Nandita
Indian producer

 Nandita Fragrances of Mumbai offer a full range of incenses, including bakhoor and dhoop cups. They also do one of my favourite incenses, Nandita Wood Spice, so I am keen to explore further. The company was founded by Sri. K.Y. Acharya (1928-2010), and is based in Mumbai, with a retail store in Udupi, where Acharya was born.

Top scents: Nandita Wood Spice (49); Nandita Black Gold (35); Nandita Organic Nag Champa (33)

Scents reviewed: 4
Highest score: 49
Lowest score: 28
Average score: 35

Conclusion: I want to explore this company further.


*****

Number Five
Moksh Agarbatti

Moksh Agarbatti of Bangalore was founded in 1996 and makes Swarna Champa, a brand it is proud of, but which doesn't appear to be available in the UK. It claims to be the "world's largest selling agarbatties", with over 35 different fragrances, which they advertise on TV in India - here's a Moksh TV Advert from April 2015. They have three manufacturing unites in Bangalore.

All the sticks I have tried so far have been reasonably pleasant everyday perfume dipped charcoal sticks.  Not special for meditation or for guests, but decent everyday stuff to brighten up and freshen a room.

Top scents: Moksh Swarna Divya Sugandh (39);  Moksh Swarna Champa (36); Moksh Akash Phool (33);  Moksh Swarna Gulab (35);  Moksh Swarna RajaniGandha (33) 


Incense reviewed: 9
Highest score: 39
Lowest score: 22
Average: 31

Conclusion: I am happy to use Moksh for my everyday incense


*****

Number Six
Hari Om Fragrance
Indian producer


Hari Om Fragrance was founded in 1990 in Bangalore. They copy existing popular brands such as MokshSugandha Swarna,  and Sri Sai Flora, but also have their own brands which are well established, such as Sai Bhajan, and some scents which appear to be original and quite divine, such as Hari Om Tez. The quality of packaging is very good, and the incenses, be they perfume-dipped or masala, are also all of a good standard.

Top scents: Hari Om 12/- Tez (40); Hari Om Vishwa Sai (Fluxo Incense) (35); Hari Om Fluxo Incense (34); Hari Om Divine Incense Butmogra (32); Hari Om 12/- Pankudi (31)

Scents reviewed: 13
Highest score: 40
Lowest Score: 20
Average score: 30

Conclusion: They seem to be a good representative of the Indian incense market, as they carry a wide range of scents and types of incense, including masala and perfume-dipped, mainly aimed at the domestic market. They are, essentially, the quintessence of domestic Indian incense.


*****

Number Seven

SAC (Sandesh)/GR International
Indian producer

The Sandesh Agarbathi Company (SAC) was founded in 1970 by D.N.P. Guptha  in Bangalore, the centre of India's incense industry. They started as a cottage industry, but are now a significant exporter around the world, with over 250 different incense products, many of which are listed on the American retail site Incense OnTheWay.  The company is a member of the All India Agarbathi Manufactures Association. Products are mostly everyday perfume-dipped. Quite competent. They also do several acceptable masala.

Top scents:  SAC Atma Darshan Flora (masala - 34); SAC FrankIncense Myrrh (masala - 33); SAC Patchouli (cone - 33); SAC Jasmine (32);  SAC Champa (32); SAC Rose  (30)


Scents reviewed: 11
Highest score: 34
Lowest score: 20
Average score:  29

A decent everyday incense company who make cheap perfume-dipped and masala incense. I'm quite happy to explore further.

GR International is the same company as SAC so I'm keeping them together (it's cool that I gave them the same score!)


GR International
GR International were founded in 1970, and are based in Bangalore. The company have started and abandoned a few websites, but incense-sticks-supplier.com appears to be the most recent; they started a blog early in 2013, but didn't keep up with it. 

Top scents: GR International Sandalo (42);  GR International Fengshui Earth (33);  GR International Strawberry (32);  GR International Eucalyptus (32): GR International Fengshui Metal (32): GR International Tangerine (30)

Scents reviewed: 10
Highest score: 42
Lowest score:
Average score: 29

Conclusion: A typical perfume dipped incense maker, but I tend to like some of their products - not hugely, the scores are usually around 32, but enough to keep an interest. I especially like their Sandalwood cones. I'll keep on exploring their products to see if they have another one that I enjoy as much as the Sandalo.


*****

Number Eight
Ranga Rao (Flute)
Indian producer

N. Ranga Rao & Sons Exports
 of Mumbai have been selling incense since 1948, and export to 60 countries. They use Flute, Cycle, Lia and Angel brand names, and also make Woods and Rhythm brand incense.

Listed as Number One brand in India in January 2019.


Scents reviewed: 6
Highest: 40
Lowest: 24
Average: 28

*****

Number Nine

Mysore Sugandhi
Indian producer

The Mysore Sugandhi Dhoop Factory of Bangalore was formed in 1934, and claims to be the first exporter of incense from India - their name means the fragrant incense factory of Mysore, and their Chandon Dhoop was made under the patronage of the Maharaja of Mysore.

They provide some incense for Aargee - the Aargee tube series are regular Sugandhi products under a different wrapper.

Scents reviewed: 7
High score: 33
Low score: 22
Average: 27

Conclusion: Everything I have tried by Sungandhi so far has been perfume dipped, but highly scented, making them moderately attractive, even if somewhat limited.


*****

Number Ten

Mahendra / Betco
Indian producer

Mahendra Perfumery Works of Bangalore were formed in 1921. Betco International is their export division.

Top scents:  Betco Hanuman (35);  Mahendra Bhajan (33); Betco Saraswathi (33); Betco Bouquet (31); Mahendra Arora (30); Betco Rose (30)

Scents reviewed: 10
Top score: 35
Low score: 17
Average: 26

Conclusion: A well established perfume-dipped incense maker who make pleasant enough products for everyday use. While nothing special, the scents are a little better than average.  I'll continue to explore.

*****

Number Eleven

Sage Spirit

Native American producer

Sage Spirit are a company founded in 1995 by a Native American tribe, the Jicarilla Apache, who live on the Jicarilla reservation in New Mexico, not far from the border with Colorado. Burning sage smudge sticks is part of Native American rituals, and the company make and sell traditional sage smudges, but have also branched out into making Asian style perfume-dipped incense sticks.

Top scents:  Blue Corn Flower (38);  Cedar (36)

Scents reviewed: 5
Highest score: 38
Lowest score: 16
Average: 26



Conclusion: I went overboard with Sage Spirit when I first burned them. Then I felt I had over-rated them, and scored them down. And then I felt that the scents, though soft, had a unique and delicate touch that actually I am quite fond of. At this point I don't know where I am with them. I guess I shall keep exploring them until I make up my mind!


*****

The Rest



Padmini
Indian producer

Padmini were founded in the 1960s. Apparently they became known in the US for their little dhoop sticks.  The company is not that well established in the UK, though Aargee import the little dhoop sticks, Gold Statue  and a few others.


Top scent: Gold Statue  (34)

Scents reviewed: Three
Top score: 34
Low score: 25
Average: 29

Conclusion: A decent everyday perfumed incense producer.

*****


Metro Agarbatti Company of Pakistan
Pakistan producer
The Metro Agarbatti Company of Karachi, Pakistan, use an image of a white and ginger cat as their trademark, and call it the Cat Brand. The company was formed in 1970, and are the largest incense company in Pakistan, with 95% of the market. They are working hard to improve their export trade, and have been achieving some success with the Metro Milan.

Top scents:  Metro Rose (31);  Metro Three in one (30)

Scents reviewed: 4
Highest score: 31
Lowest score:
Average score: 25

Conclusion:  A modest though reasonably attractive basic perfume dipped incense maker.


*****

Darshan Incense
Indian producer

Darshan International of Bangalore was founded in 1987 by T. Srinivas, then carried on by his sons in 2000. They deal in perfume dipped sticks, cones and dhoops. Some Darshan TV ads: Black Stone,Black Stone 2Black Stone 3Black StoneBharathHari.


Top scents: Darshan Kanishka (33)

Scents reviewed: 4
Highest score: 33
Lowest score: 23
Average: 25

Conclusion:  A maker of decent enough perfume-dipped everyday incense. 

*****


Krishan Products of Mumbai 
Indian producer
Krishan Products were founded in 1951, and claim to be India's leading manufacturer and exporter of premium quality incense sticks. They do a range of fruit and other standard scents. Website: krishanincense.com


Scents reviewed: 4
Top score: 30
Low score: 20
Average: 25

Conclusion:  A modest everyday basic perfume dipped incense maker.

*****


Knox incence
(Possible German importer and distributor)
German incense company, known for cones and wooden German smokers. Founded 1865. They have a manufacturing unit in Germany, but it is unclear if the cones are made there, or somewhere in India.

Scents reviewed: 2
High score: 30
Low score: 20
Average: 25

Conclusion: Not impressed so far, but the cones are cheap enough, and the company is famous, so I am willing to try a few more.


*****

Auroshika Incense
Indian producer

Incense company founded in 1973 in Pondicherry, India. The sticks are made from a handrolled charcoal base, then dipped in chemical perfume.

Top scents: None

Scents reviewed: 3
Average score: 24

Conclusion: None of the scents tried so far have really impressed, but they have been soft and reasonably pleasant. I am willing to explore further.


*****


HEM Corporation
Indian producer

The HEM Corporation has incense factories in Bangalore, Mumbai and Bhiwandi; it was founded in 1975, and is one of the largest incense companies in the world, with over 100 different incense products which are exported to over 50 countries around the world. Most people will have heard of HEM and tried their sticks. For some people, HEM will be their main or only knowledge of incense. The incense is all chemical based - the sticks are hand made by rolling a charcoal paste onto sticks, which are then dipped into chemical perfumes.


Top scents: HEM Frankincense-Myrrh (40); HEM Blueberry (36); HEM Cherry Vanilla (32); HEM Precious Mogra (Jasmine) (31); HEM Strawberry (30)

Scents rated: 23
Highest score: 40
Lowest score: 8
Average score: 25

Conclusion: Not my favourite incense make by any means; they are inconsistent, and can make some vile chemical based "floral" scents, but at their best they can produce some cheap and attractive scents suitable for everyday burning. I am inclined against them, but will succumb to cheap deals, and I'm sometimes surprised by how much I enjoy some scents.


*****

Gopal Joie incense
Indian producer
Gopal, trading as Joie, make fairly standard cheap incense sticks and wet dhoops. The ingredients they use may all be natural, but the scents are artificial, created out of processing the natural ingredients. The scents are unimaginative - White Rose, Lily of the Valley, Orange, etc. The package decoration is uninspired and poor quality (a blurred image of a bunch of white roses for example). The scents are weak, and will often reveal more of the base burning material than the intended perfume.

The Gopal Group, which sells tobacco, chemicals, industrial perfume, etc,  was formed in 1942. They have incense factories in Delhi, Bangalore and Baddi.

Top scents: Joie Sea Breeze (31)

Scents reviewed: 9
Highest score: 31
Lowest score:
Average score: 22

Conclusion: Not a company I am interested in buying from, but I will continue to keep an open mind.

*****

Tulasi Incense (Sarathi International)
Indian producer

Sarathi International, trading as Tulasi, have incense sticks available from a number of UK internet sites, such as the Asian Cookshop and Incense Essentials, either in hex boxes of 20 or square boxes of 8 sticks for an average cost of around 5p a stick. They produce decent enough scents, and are a fairly consistent if largely unexciting incense company. The sticks tend to be of modest size, and are hand rolled from charcoal paste onto dyed sticks and then perfume dipped. Nothing exciting, but they are cheap, and tend to turn up on market stalls and hardware stores.

I was recently encouraged to try the Tulasi Vidwan, which turned out to be a traditional masala incense - while it's not one of the best, it is a proper job incense. Nice one.

The company was founded in 1945 as a small family business, and has grown to an operation employing over 300 people from a modern 75,000 square ft factory in Bangalore - which it claims is the largest incense factory in Bangalore. The company exports to 45 countries worldwide.

Top scents: Tulasi Vidwan (34); Tulasi Frankincense (30)

Scents reviewed: 18
Highest score: 34
Lowest score: -1
Average score: 20

Conclusion: Mid to lower end everyday perfume-dipped charcoal incense. Nothing special - some scents work OK, others less so, and some are awful. Not a company I was interested in exploring further, until I was turned on to the Vidwan. Now I shall keep an open mind on this, and other incense companies.


*****

Distributors

These companies do not make incense but commission it and sell it under their own brand name. Some distributors, such as Gokula and Happy Hari, use the same producers as sources. They are not producers themselves, but they serve a useful function of supporting local producers, and bringing either quality or cheap incense into the UK, Europe, and America.


Number One



Gokula Incense
UK importer and distributor
of Indian incense

Scents reviewed: 7
Highest: 45
Lowest: 30
Average: 40


Number Two


Happy Hari's Incense
UK importer and distributor 
of Indian incense
(Ceased Trading Dec 2017)


Scents reviewed: 8
Highest: 48
Lowest: 28
Average: 38

Conclusion: Paul Eagle found a quality incense maker, and for over 20 years imported decent incense into the UK. I have enjoyed the incenses I have tried - they are certainly above average, and I am now attempting to grab those scents I haven't yet tried, and to buy a few packets of those scents I like.


***


Number Three
Aargee Incense
UK importer and distributor 
of Indian incense

British based company founded in 1978. They don't directly make incense, but import it, and have incense made for them under several brand names including Stamford, and Imperial. They use a range of incense companies, including Goloka, Tulasi,  Padmini, and Satya (Shrinivas Sugandhalaya). The quality is as variable as the intended markets, but includes some of the best incense made, and never sinks very low.

Top scents: Stamford Chakra Ajna (Third Eye)  (42);  Stamford Chakra Muladhara Root  (40); Aargee Imperial Bharat Mata Bouquet Fragrance  (39); Aargee Laxmi Pooja  (38) ;   Stamford Midnight Calm (by Satya)  (34);  Aargee Patchouli  (33);  Aargee Imperial Raja Rani Lavender Fragrence  (33);  Ganesh Flora by Aargee (32); Stamford Earth Angel  (32);   Stamford Magic Angel  (31);   Aargee Jasmine    (30)   

Scents reviewed: 25
Highest score: 42
Lowest score:
Average score: 32

Conclusion: A consistently reliable company. At their best an Aargee brand incense will be amongst the very best incense in the world. At their worse, a decent incense that may not inspire, but will be worth buying again.

*****

Number four
Sifcon International
UK importer and distributor
of Indian incense

UK based  Sifcon International company are a wholesalers dealing in household goods. They import a range of incense sticks and cones, such as Bhagvati Ppure, plus unbranded incense which they have packaged for themselves.


Scents rated: 10
Top score: 40
Low score: 21
Average: 31

Conclusion: Sifcon incense products are excellent value for money. They mainly deal in low cost everyday incense, but also bring in decent masala incense under the Bhagvati Ppure brand.


*****

Number five
Tree of Life
UK importer of Asian incense

UK brand started in 1990, taken over by Cha Cha Dum Dum, who closed in 2018. The brand is up for sale.  The packets claim to be made in the UK, but the style and quality is more indicative of Asian manufacture - possibly Vietnam.


Incense reviewed: 5
High score: 33
Low score: 20
Average: 28


Conclusion: Decent enough everyday incense.



*****

Number six
One Aromatics
UK importer and distributor
of Indian incense
One Aromatics is a brand of incense sold by One Village, a distributor of  fair trade goods made in poor or disadvantaged communities.  The company was founded in 1979.  Their range of incense is made by the Auroville community in India.

Scents reviewed: 6
Highest: 33
Lowest: 10
Average: 24

Conclusion: The Auroville community is interesting, so I'd like to explore more incense from them. These One Aromatics are not impressive, but at their best they are decent everyday scents - but they can also be a little crude and harsh.

*****

Number seven
Juicy Jay's Thai Incense Sticks
USA importer and distributor

The Juicy Jays company was founded in America in the late 1990s to sell flavoured cigarette papers, and a few years ago - probably 2013, launched their incense series. The aromas have tempting names such as Orange Overload, Funkincense, and Apple Brown Betty. They are cheap and made in Thailand.

Scents reviewed: 5
Highest score: 23
Lowest score: 18
Average: 21

Conclusion: Not a company I'm interested in buying again, though the incense is not evil.



*****

Number eight
Ancient Wisdom
UK importer and distributor
of Indian and Vietnam incense
 Ancient Wisdom are a UK distributor of gift ware and incense, based in Sheffield. They import incense from Thailand and sell under their own name, or the brand name Dawn Of Time, or as wholesale bulk lots which are then sold on under names such as Ashley's Workshop.

Top scents: Ancient Wisdom Red Dragon Incense Tibetan Musk (31)

Scents rated: 8
Highest score: 31
Lowest score: 19
Average score: 22

Conclusion: One of my least favourite incense companies


*****

Number nine
Wild Berry
USA importer and distributor
Wild Berry is an American incense which is starting to sell in the UK. The sticks are colourful, and have wacky modern names, like Pounding Surf and Baking Brownies. They have a pleasant aroma on the stick - quite sweet and like apple pie. When burned, they all smell the same - very synthetic.

Top scents: None
Scents rated: 5
Average score: 20

Conclusion: Not impressed so far, but as I've only experienced five sticks, I am open to trying again

*****

Number ten

Emporium UK
UK importer and distributor
of Indian and Thai incense

EmporiumUK.biz are a UK based importing business. They distribute incense, and also have their own brands which are made in India and Thailand. Among the brands they own are the nasty Divine Spirit and the cheap small Spiritual Sky. They have an incense factory in Calcutta.

Top scents: None
Incense tried: 8
Highest score: 25
Lowest score: 9
Average score: 17

Conclusion: Mostly cheap and nasty, but at their best they can be harmless.



*****



20 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  2. What about Happy Hari? ie: Me :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd probably put you under Aargee, but above GR International. But I haven't been burning much of your stuff recently, as I have an increased sensitivity to halmaddi. Aargee are all over the place - they can commission some really cheap shit, but they can also commission some awesome stuff from the best incense makers.

      Do you know Gokula-incense? They do some really cool stuff that I think you'd like.

      Delete
    2. Here's their website with contact details

      http://www.gokula-incense.co.uk/

      Delete
  3. Have you tried the recent MetroMilan agarbatti, they have different packaging hexagonal packs, with flavours such as Amber, Rose, Lavender, Jasmine, Bakhoor, Lily, They also have a flora batti, and a product named Blunt wave with flavours such as baby powder, vanilla, jamaican fruit, egyptian musk, and 20 more flavours in a box.

    Its really good.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I may have some in my incense box (I have HUGE piles of unreviewed incense - people keep sending me stuff, and I will buy stuff I've not seen before, so I am rather swamped by the size of the task!). I'll have a rummage around. If I can't find any, then I'll certainly look into it - sounds interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  5. My company have the agency of metromilan incense across u.s contant:347-8429987

    ReplyDelete
  6. Red nag!!! Try it. If u like nag Champa. Satya or gold. They are made by shanthimalai. Who employ and help women in need and donate large protions of proceeds. Very strong nag classic smell. Its a must try.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm seeing this as available in the US through Essence of the Ages, http://www.essenceoftheages.com/shanth/shant1.html, but I can't see it as being available in the UK.

    Anyone know of a UK outlet?

    ReplyDelete
  8. What do you think of One Aromatic products, sold here in the UK? I really like their Ambrosia (which is Halmaddi). Do you rate them, I think it's a lovely incense... https://www.oneworldshop.co.uk/one-aromatics-ambrosia-incense

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks for letting me know Heather. Looks interesting. I've ordered six, taking advantage of the 10% discount for signing up to the newsletter. I did take a look at One Village's own website (http://onevillage.org/aromatics.htm) where they have an offer of 12 different fragrances for £16 with free posting, which makes it a little cheaper, but was quite happy just to have six at this point in case they are not to my liking. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  10. Yes I've bought the 12 pack in the past, I bought one of each, but wasn't really keen on some of the others (though the Cedarwood, Sandlewood and Rose weren't too bad).. Of course you could actually just buy 12 packs of the Ambrosia.. They allow you to choose whatever you want in the 12 pack offer. I buy their soap as well, too sometimes. I live opposite Findhorn, I'm sure you've heard of it, and went on my first trip there last year, and discovered they sell it! So I was able to get another two packs! Lol. I do have some of the other scents left. They're not too bad. The Jasmine is nice. I find some incense, kind of burns the back of your throat, I think I've seen you say that. But the One Aromatics Ambrosia doesnt.. :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Incense with halmaddi tends to do that - especially some of the Mothers stuff, which rips my throat apart! I can take low levels of it, but as halmaddi is very popular in America a lot of the incense made for the American market, especially the "connoisseur" incense market, packs it in. It's probably the only tree based incense that I don't get along with, other tree resins or woods I love - amber, frankincense, myrrh, sandalwood, agarwood, etc. I'm exploring Egyptian and Persian incense at the moment (and will get around to reviewing it at some point!), which is fascinating, and doesn't use halmaddi, preferring other woods, particularly agarwood (or oud).

    I have a Facebook page Incense Inthewind (https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100015588154537) which I use occasionally to get information from incense makers in India, Asia and the Middle East. It's fascinating how many there are!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I have got round to reviewing the Ambrosia.

    http://incenseinthewind.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/one-aromatics-ambrosia.html

    ReplyDelete
  13. Very interesting... can you tell me how would you rate Darshan incense... the only one i know yet....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Simone

      I've now added them to the above article. I've only rated four of their scents, but they seem a maker of decent enough perfume-dipped everyday incense. There are plenty worse though also plenty more interesting incense makers, but essentially they appear to me to be OK. They seem to be a well established domestic incense company in India as they frequently make TV commercials.

      I hope that helps!

      Delete
  14. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  15. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  16. SVA Organics is one of the trusted essential oils exporter, essential oils wholesaler and Fragrance Supplier in India
    . Buy high quality natural & 100% pure naturals oil from www.svanaturals.com.

    ReplyDelete

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